Marianne J. Dyson

Photography

Nature & Travel Photos

All photos are copyrighted by Marianne Dyson, and may not be copied to other websites or used in printed or electronic publications without written permission. High resolution (300 dpi) versions are available for publication. Prices range from free (with byline credit) to "real" money, depending on use. Ask about similar images - not all of a series are posted here.

Contact me for more information.

Photos from visits are in my Appearances Gallery. Photos from the JSC Memorial after the Columbia accident are on the Columbia Quotes page.

Photos Grouped by Topic

Journey to Middle Earth, New Zealand

We visited to New Zealand in January 2013. We landed in Auckland on the North Island, and spent the first week driving east to Thames, then south to Wellington, stopping at Rotorua, Hobbiton, Turangi, and Palmerston North on the way south. We spent the second week around Wellington, visiting museums (Te Papa and the WETA Cave), hiking Zealandia, the coast, and taking a trip east to Stonehenge. The final week, we ferried to the South Island, landing at Pictin and staying at Furnaux Lodge and then further south at Hamner Springs. Below are but a few of the more than 2,600 photos my husband and I took!

Ponga fern tree. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Gorgeous Huia area. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Welcome to Moo Zealand!(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Coast view on drive to Thames, near Miranda. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Coast view. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Morning glory on coast. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Edwards Lookout near Thames, our first hike. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Expecting a brontosaurus!(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Very steep climb, old logging rails. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Fern tree just amazing. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

You go first! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Track heads down into jungle. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We have to turn back, the track has become a bog, and it's getting dark soon. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Made it out! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Hobbiton

Hobbiton. This is where Gandolf rode in, so we did, too. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)


Me and my husband at Hobbiton, New Zealand. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Hobbiton gardens in center of valley. See tree on hilltop in distance--that's Baggins' tree. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Another view of Baggins' hill from distance. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Benches came in large for Hobbits to look small, and small for Gandolf to look large. Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Hobbiton furnishings. People were paid to use these things to "age" them. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

See how hobbit homes are embedded in hill. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

See tree? That's fake! The real one used in LOTR died, so they made a replica out of al-u-min-i-um (that's how they say it), complete with fake leaves. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This is bench that Gandolf sat on. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Gorgeous flowers everywhere! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Window view. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Another hobbit hole. Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

See Party Tree in distance with lake behind. We walked up hill to Baggins and then down to the tree and around to the left side of the lake to Green Dragon on the opposite side. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Closer to Party Tree. Note left side is dying, so Hobbit movie, supposed to be in past when tree younger, does not show whole tree. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Under the Party Tree. Shade was great on hot, sunny day! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

East of Lake, see Green Dragon tavern in distance. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Green Dragon Tavern is across little bridge. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

View from on bridge looking back at Party Tree across lake. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Bar in Green Dragon. Had ginger beer here. Only 1 percent alcohol. Hobbits get drunk easily! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Heading back on opposite side of Lake. See Party Tree. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking back at Green Dragon and bridge. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Edge of Lake. See Party Tree. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Crossroads, Green Dragon and Hobbiton. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Real oak leaf I picked up at Rotorua and the fake one from Baggins’ tree. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Mount "Doom" Area: Oraki Korako Thermal Springs

Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Water was VERY hot!(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Hearty grass at Oraki Korako Thermal Springs. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Tree book says Kamahi, black birch-looks like aspen to me. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Oraki Korako Visitor Center, across the lake from the Springs. Cost $30 each for roundtrip. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Huka Falls near Taupo. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Sign says "When Frosty" versus "Slippery When Wet."(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Drive from Taupo to Turangi. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Tangario Crossing/"Mt. Doom" Challenge

Tangario Alpine Crossing Hike past Mt. Ngauruhoe, a.k.a "Mt. Doom" in Lord of the Rings. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Initial stretch followed a cascading stream full of sulfur and posted with signs saying the water wasn't treated, yet some hikers drank from the stream. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Jagged rocks that had to be climbed around. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Mt. Doom closer. We will pass "in front" of it. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Helpful walkways over very rough ground that apparently floods often enough to require this walkway. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Mt. Doom awaits in the far distance, about 3.5 hours away on foot. The last outhouse is around this bend at the bottom of "the devil's staircase."((Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Waterfall that we will visit on the way down, as seen from outhouse. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Mt. Doom seems peaceful enough, but the trail was closed because of eruption danger. It erupted in August and November 2012 and took out the second part of the trail we are on. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Behind my husband is the ridge that overlooks Emerald Lakes. Our son went on ahead and reached that ridge. We will get to the "tooth" sticking up. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

From just below the "tooth" can see the other side. Notice someone lost their pack off this steep ridge. Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking back at Mt. Doom from near the "tooth." We crossed that sandy area full of dust devils. ((Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

I went up to the little "tooth" and got blown backwards. Stopped here to eat lunch and wait for our son, but mostly got mouthfuls of sand and grit gusting to 50 mph. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking back the way we had come and must go again. Track goes between hills. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

One last look up, trying to see my son on the ridge which is about 6500 feet tall. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We're back down in the dustbowl looking up at the "tooth" again. I fell coming down that slope and got a fist-sized bruise on my thigh. Does this look like Mars, or what?! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Mt. Doom. Our son rejoins us and says that from atop the ridge, he could see that there is a geologic monitoring station up in that crater. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

A map of the lava flows of Ngauruhoe. Blue is prehistoric, red is 1975. The 2011 eruption isn't shown!(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

See the lava flows. We are in the South crater at 1600 m. (5,200 ft.) Summit is 2400 meters. The sign included instructions for what to do if there is an eruption: Run!(Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

View of "devil's staircase" from the waterfall. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The jagged area to the center left is the Devil's Staircase--I lost count, but it was more than 300 steps built into the rock. For scale, see the tiny people on the trail in the lower left. It was better coming down than going up. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

A refreshing stop at the waterfall--I took off my shoes, but the water was so cold I could only stand in it for the time it took to take the photo! (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We emerged from the valley and could see Mt. Doom again. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The road away from Mt. Doom and an hour-long wait on a hot bus for one lost hiker who didn't understand that the trail was closed beyond Emerald Lakes and had to be turned around. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Little piece of “Mt. Doom” I picked up at the bottom of the Devil’s staircase shown laid on top of postcard I got at the local Information Center. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We stopped at a ski lift near Ohakune, but it was closed because of fog. So we hiked around a bit. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

From atop the rocks in the previous photo, could see the valley and waterfalls in the distance and the snow-capped peaks of Mt. Ruapehu. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

When I got up here, all I could see were clouds, so I asked God if He would mind giving me a peek at his wondrous creation, and I swear the blue sky appeared as I opened my eyes! And there were at least 5 waterfalls! (It clouded back up almost as soon as I took the photo.) (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Windy, twisty Route 54 road led up to Stormy Point. Could see mountains in the distance. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Postcard worthy view! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Just north of Palmerston is where the two tectonic plates meet along a gorge. Lots of wind power here. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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More New Zealand: Steam Museum, Car Museum, Wellington

Steam Museum was full of cool engines. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum had flowers outside, too. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum sheep outside. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum’s owner Colin Stevenson showed us his workshop. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum anvil in workshop. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steam Museum tractor still works—he let Tom turn the wheel. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Car Museum—I especially like this hood ornament. I want one of these on my spaceship! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This is a Duryea Phaeton. After reading the description, I decided it would be the most fun to try to drive because the controls are so totally backwards! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Car Museum Bentley. I like the color of this one! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Car Museum Jaguar. I wouldn’t mind showing up at a book signing in one of these. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Car Museum. They are so cute, but probably only good for golf carts! Maybe on the Moon? (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Car Museum car of the future? Only if it has a rocket engine! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Wellington

Our cousin’s house is somewhere down there near an athletic field in Wellington. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We toured the Wellington Botanic Garden. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Rugby game (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Beehive government center (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Bookstore—Look Out Frodo! (They didn’t have my space books, but they had Homework Help on the Internet!) (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Art everywhere in Wellington. I took this photo thinking these were just sculptures, and then went around the back… (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Ha ha! They are public restrooms! A lot more fun than port-o-potties! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington harbor is cool, but the clouds look like UFO “FTL poof” trails! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington art is everywhere. A poem chiseled on rock in harbor. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Saw this ship in Wellington and again near Pictin. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This art came from the Weta Cave special effects studio. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The Embassy is where they showed the premier of The Hobbit which came out a few weeks before we arrived. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington art. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington art. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Carter Observatory in Wellington (at the top of the cable car) where I met up with my Facebook friend Hari who volunteers there. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The sun came out briefly, so we got a photo of the human sundial. I want to build one of these in Houston! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Sundial. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wellington Botanic Garden. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Te Papa, Maritime, Weta Cave

Ah! Orks at Te Papa museum. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Don’t worry, I behaved. They only feed naughty tourists to the orks. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Poor giant moa were unfortunately good eating and hunted to extinction. Before humans, all they had to worry about were giant eagles. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

It was raining, so we visited the Maritime Museum on Tuesday. These sculptures were nearby. I didn’t take any photos in the museum. We spent a lot of the day doing puzzles, playing instruments, and generally catching up on sleep! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

It was still raining, so we visited the Weta Cave in Miramar and were greeted by this monster in the lobby! Weta Cave is the special effects studio that created props and effects for Lord of the Rings, District 9, King Kong, and many other movies. Weta is a monster insect native to New Zealand which we saw for real later. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Weta Cave weapons on display. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

I want one of these! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

My precious! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Miniature elf. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

How about those Frodo feet! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Helmets from LOTR. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Steampunk weapon. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The contract that Bilbo had to sign reminded me of my book contracts! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Our “insider’s” tour guide, Cat Auburn. She builds ray guns and is handy with a knife, too. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Ginger the cat kept us entertained while staying at our cousin’s. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Hikes near Wellington

A hike in Upper Hutt, near where the scenes for the elve’s home in Rivendale were filmed. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area wild flowers. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area bridge. We crossed 12 of these. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area falls from the dam. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area—natural Hobbit hole? (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Upper Hutt area. Sure the elves are watching me. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This is the Makara Coast, of Cook’s Strait between the North and South Islands. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Makara coast. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Makara coast. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We didn’t get too far before one of the wind turbines came into view like some alien spacecraft perched on the ridge. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

It was a very steep drop beside the trail. I was glad the wind was from the water and tended to blow me away from this cliff! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking back to the shore where we left the car parked. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The wind turbine is our destination. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wind turbine makes a loud whap whap sound. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking back toward the car, now too small to see. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The coast. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

I’m in an old war gun emplacement—thinking how turbines are so much prettier than guns atop a mountain! For scale, see blue of my husband's shirt as he walks on trail.(© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

It is huge! What a marvel of engineering. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Heading back down, some of the way on my bottom! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Can you imagine ancient people coming across these mysterious structures? (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Dual use land, the cows and sheep don’t mind the turbines at all. Or the hikers for that matter! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Coastal rock is natural sculpture. I’m not saying what I think it looks like… (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Zealandia Nature Preserve

Zealandia mother duck and chicks. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia had live Weta, the monster bugs the studio is named after. We saw them in a tree display, but they were so ugly they broke the camera—not really, my photo just didn’t turn out that great! They don't bite. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia, home of the primitive tuatara. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia quail. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia fern, a symbol of fertility. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia, more fern tree fronds. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia trees were impressive—see Thor at base of one below me (I’m up on a lookout platform). (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia giant tree. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia wild flower. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandi, Saddleback—a bird that the god Maui burned for not bringing him water after he saved the world. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia, the hui makes a very funny call. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia, kaka, a native parrot that lives a very long life. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This is a sign about glow worms which we saw at the Botanic gardens at night during the rain on Tuesday night. They are as bright as fireflies, but do not blink. Very bright bluish white and everywhere on the banks near the streams. In the day, we sometimes saw them on threads, string thin and green, about a centimeter long. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Zealandia. Shak spreads its wings. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Kaori hike

Kaori morning hike. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The farmer said not to worry about the cows, that they were “good as gold” and no bulls were out. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Kaori hike view. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Power line coming from the wind turbines. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

So lovely, and this was just 10 minutes from our cousin’s house. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Proof I really was there. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Kaori hike. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

What’s that smell?. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wonder what’s down there? Unfortunately, we have to turn around because Tom’s flight is in a few hours. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

After we dropped Tom at the airport, we drove along the coast. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Then we revisited the Botanic Gardens where I got this photo of an artichoke. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Got lucky with this photo, so delicately beautiful. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Why is it so hard to get a close photo of a red rose? Someone told me that digital cameras tend to saturate in red? Anyway, this is one of the best I’ve ever gotten. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Orange and fuzzy, so adorable. This was in their greenhouse. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Shy rose. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

What are these called, anyone know? (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The lighting seemed about perfect for this one. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Visit to Stonehenge Aotearoa, Wellington Fault.

The layout of Stonehenge in England—this hangs on the wall in the lobby. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Stonehenge Aotearoa is not a replica of Stonehenge in England, but it is similar in size. It is set up as a working “sky calendar” for New Zealand which is in the Southern Hemisphere. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Gateway/Entrance. This path is for the “gods” who may enter the mortal realm only four times a year, on the solstices and equinoxes. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Astronomer and founder Richard Hall told stories and showed slides and then took a group of us tourists into the circle. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Me and Richard Hall, definitely kindred spirits even though we live on opposite sides of the world. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

This stone is the obelisk. Its shadow at noon marks the sign the sun is in (Capricorn) on the figure 8, called an analemma. He explained that the actual sign does not match the dates of those signs in the newspaper horoscopes. They are off because of precession. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Thor is at the center of the circle facing the East marker—see how the top of the East stone I’m in front of lines up with the horizon? (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Now Thor is looking south at me, but it feels like it should be north to me because of the shadows: everything is backwards in the southern hemisphere! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The Seven Sisters point to the horizon where the Pleides rises. Pleides are in Taurus & marked the beginning of the year 5,000 yrs. ago. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Me at Pleides stones. In Aotearoa, stars known as Matariki & her 6 daughters. Their rising marks the beginning of the Maori new year. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Richard Hall’s Book which I got him to sign for me--full of great stories and research. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

View of the road we came in on and will use to return to Wellington. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

We stopped near “Isengard" on the way back. I think this is the river the elf turned into horses to save Frodo. A fault line runs under it right here, so during a quake, maybe it churns out some horsepower of another sort! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The fault is marked here. Thankfully, it held steady while we were there! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Looking out at the park they built along the fault line to keep people from building houses on it. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The sign says, “Wellington Fault Crush Zone.” I guess someone forgot to warn the tree! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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South Island, New Zealand

The first quarter moon is upside down! Note left side is lit, and it has the rabbit right side up! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Best I could do with my camera: proof that Orion is upside down in New Zealand! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The Southern Cross, Crux, four bright stars. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Hike from Furnaux on Queen Charlotte’s Trail

View from beginning of trail near Furnaux. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Old tractor reminded me of steam museum, though this one was gas powered. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The water level has risen over the centuries and created these bays. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

These flowers were everywhere in New Zealand, but I was told they aren’t native. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Don’t you just want to go dive into that turquoise water?. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

So pretty. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The hike took 4 hours, and the taxi takes 30 minutes! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Dinner has arrived! This time the guys have caught lots of scallops, and John cooks up some abalone--which he calls black gold. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Taxi from Furnaux to Pictin, Drive to Hamner Springs

Our cabins—we slept on bunk beds and used a community shower that cost $2 for 10 minutes of hot water. No hair dryer, and it was COLD at night. Does this qualify for roughing it?! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Our water taxi to Pictin. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Drive to Hamner Springs. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Wind turbines in the South, too. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Seals down there. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

View along the road of South Island New Zealand. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Hamner Springs, Drive back to Pictin

Rotary is everywhere! They sponsored this nice waiting area for the cave tour. See the Rotary wheel on top. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

I remarked in the morning that I’d done about everything except visit a cave—and then we drove past a sign for one and decided to stop. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The “eyes” are a natural formation, though the guide said no geologist could explain it. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The tour took about 45 minutes. The guide said the cave used to be underwater. The layers of limestone are shock absorbers, and he didn’t feel anything during the big Christchurch quake. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

See the pelican? I thought of the artful pelicans in Seabrook near my home. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

The guys hiked along the beach while I stayed in town, checked out the library and the birds. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

I think this is a shak. He was right outside the Information Center. The “I” stations were great for postcards and directions. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Beach view. I was surprised to see pampass grass in New Zealand. It grows all around Houston. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

King of the seagulls. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Can’t get over the color of that water. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Postcard scene. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Our ferry was cancelled, and the next was about 11 PM. We didn’t get to Wellington until about 3 AM. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

At the airport in Wellington—more Lord of the Rings sculptures—don’t let him snatch your luggage! (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

Auckland area from the air. (© 2013, Marianne Dyson)

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Mauna Kea Hawaii Telescopes

We drove up Mauna Kea, Hawaii to take the hike around, take a tour of the Keck telescope, and witness the rising of the full moon within days of the autumnal equinox. It was a magical experience!

Mauna Kea seen from Route 19 (east coast) © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Almost-full Moon over Mauna Kea, as seen from Waimea, September 16 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Saddle Road to Mauna Kea goes through an Army practice area © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Endangered Silver Spike plant in protected area at Onizuka Visitor's Center at 10,000 feet up Mauna Kea © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Holes in the warning sign because of the wind © 2005, Marianne Dyson

The twin Keck domes at 13,000 feet © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Each 10-meter Keck is made of 36 mirror segments. This view is from underneath © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Pristine cinder cone on Mauna Kea © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Gemini Northern Telescope, with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in background © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Native Hawaiian Shrine on Mauna Kea, a sacred mountain © 2005, Marianne Dyson

A person is walking up the trail to the shrine © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Lake Wai'au is a glacier lake accessible by (high altitude) hike from Parking area 3. © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Even in this Mars-like environment above 13,000 feet, there is life. Bird egg found near Lake Wai'au © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Dark hill silhouette on hike back from the Lake © 2005, Marianne Dyson

The sunset from the summit of Mauna Kea © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Looking south toward Mauna Loa at sunset on Mauna Kea © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Gemini Northern Telescope, with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in background (photo 2) © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Subaru Telescope, Keck Observatory, NASA IR Telescope Facility © 2005, Marianne Dyson

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Moonrise Over Mauna Kea Series

Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 1 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 5 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 6 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 9 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 11 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Marianne Dyson watches Moonrise from Mauna Kea, photo 13 © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Sunset, time to drive down with no lights! © 2005, Marianne Dyson

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Oahu, Hawaii Series

Moon over Oahu © 2005, Marianne Dyson (this photo altered to remove window reflections)

Mokoli'i Island (Chinaman's Hat) © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Challenger Astronaut Ellison Onizuka's gravestone © 2005, Marianne Dyson

Rainbow over Waikiki © 2005, Marianne Dyson

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Pololu, Hawaii Series

View from Pololu Overlook trail looking east from north end of Hawaii © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Afternoon waves at Pololu © 2006, Marianne Dyson

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Volcano National Park, Hawaii Series

Close up of a sulfur vent, steam makes it look smokey © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Rainy day view of Kilauea Caldera with Halem'uma'u Crater © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Some natives leave offerings to the gods near Halem'uma'u Crater rim © 2006, Marianne Dyson

The steam vents near Halem'uma'u Crater were hot and smelley © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Lava flows over trees and makes shapes. I think this one looks like a rat! © 2006, Marianne Dyson

My husband poses with the "Lava Cat" © 2006, Marianne Dyson

The "ground" looked like asphalt and was sometimes hollow underneath us! © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Spooky! Lava eyes watching us... © 2006, Marianne Dyson

See the Lava Worm tunneling along? Reminded me of the book, Dune © 2006, Marianne Dyson

This is as close as it was safe to get to the top of Mauna Ulu. Even up here, there was life. © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Another view of Mauna Ulu caldera © 2006, Marianne Dyson

The ohelo plant grows in the cracks © 2006, Marianne Dyson

The birds like the berries of the pukiawe bush © 2006, Marianne Dyson

One of my favorite photos, the "lava" coast, looking southwest. The white clouds are steam from the hot lava. © 2006, Marianne Dyson

An arch of lava into the sea. I made a short video clip of the violent waves crashing and swirling around this. © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Tourists walk over the new lava (that covered the road) to see the fire fall into the sea © 2006, Marianne Dyson

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Place of Refuge area, Hawaii

Ocean view at the Place of Refuge © 2006, Marianne Dyson

Natives buried their dead in lava tubes like this one © 2006, Marianne Dyson

The Sun was above the horizon and behind a cloud, making a glowing spot on the sea. © 2006, Marianne Dyson

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School/Library visit & appearnce photos are in the Appearances Gallery.

Flowers!

Each year, I create a calendar using photos of flowers that I've come across during our travels or at Home in Houston during the previous year. I hope you enjoy them! Send email for permission and prices for reprints.


Cover and October flower for 2016 calendar. Photo taken in Tucson, AZ. (Photo © 2015, Marianne Dyson)


Cover and December flower for 2015 calendar. Photo from my garden in Houston. (Photo © 2014, Marianne Dyson)


Cover and July flower for 2014 calendar. Photo taken in Wellington, NZ. (Photo © 2013, Marianne Dyson)


Cover and March flower for 2013 calendar. Ohio Pansies. (Photo © 2012, Marianne Dyson)

2012 Cover & July flower, After-the-Flood Flower, taken in Canton, Ohio, July, 2011. See high resolution copy. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

Cover & December flower of 2011 Calendar. Photo taken by me at Tsi Chi Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, June, 2010. See high resolution copy. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

Cover of 2010 Calendar. Photo taken by me of water lily taken at Montreal Botanical Gardens, August 2009. See high resolution copy. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

Dyson 2011 Calendar

2011 January flower. Photo taken at Taipei Botanical Garden in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 February flowers. Photo from my garden in Houston in 2010. They really do bloom in February. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 March flower. Photo taken in my garden in Houston in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 April flower. Photo taken at Taipei Botanical Garden in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 May flower. Photo taken In Hualien, Taiwan in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 June flower. Photo taken at Taipei Botanical Garden in 2010. I use this for a screen saver. It is amazing in high resolution. Contact me for publication rights. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 July flower. Photo taken at a street vendor's shop in Hualien, Taiwan in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 August flower. Photo taken at summer vacation rental home in the Catskills, New York in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 September flower. Photo taken on a mountain hike in the Catskills, New York in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 October flower. Photo taken by my husband at Taipei Botanical Garden in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

2011 November flower. Photo taken on a hike inthe Catskills, New York in 2010. (Photo © 2011, Marianne Dyson)

December 2011 flower & cover of 2011 Calendar. Photo taken by me at Tsi Chi Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, June, 2010. See high resolution copy. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

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2010 Calendar

2010 January flower, taken at Montreal Botanical Gardens in August, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 February, daisies at Montreal Botanical Gardens, photographed August, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 March flower, thistle photographed in May 2009 at Armand Bayou Nature Center in Pasadena, Texas. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 April flowers, taken at Montreal Botanical Gardens in August, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 May flowers, mums from my brother's garden in Hayden Lake, Idaho, taken July, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 June flowers, wildflowers, Calgary, Canada, taken July, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 July flowers look like fireworks to me! Montreal Botanical Gardens, taken August, 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

Cover of 2010 Calendar and August flower. Photo of water lily taken at Montreal Botanical Gardens, August 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 September flower, taken on hike in Calgary, Canada, July 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 October flower, from Montreal Botanical Gardens, August 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 November flowers from Montreal Botanical Gardens, August 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

2010 December flower, taken at Montreal Botanical Gardens, August 2009. (Photo © 2010, Marianne Dyson)

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Visit my Flickr page. See this gorgeous lily.

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